Nominations & Election

A few years ago my phone rang and on the other end of the line was Lisa Hopper, who at the time was SWASFAA’s past-president.   To my surprise she asked if I was interested in throwing my hat in the ring to run for SWASFAA’s president-elect.  Surely, I did not hear her correctly.  “Oh, boy, how could I be qualified?”    Way out of my comfort zone, like way out-in-left-field.   I took a huge leap of faith and said, “yes”

Looking back, I’m glad that I took the leap.  Having the opportunity to meet our SWASFAA members was definitely the highlight of 2016.  There is a reason why SWASFAA is a great organization, our members.  As president, I received tremendous support from past presidents, prior board members, and of course current board members.  Everyone “had my back”. Taking that leap of faith in spring of 2014 provided me not only tremendous professional growth, but a lifetime of wonderful memories.

If you’ve thought about becoming involved with the SWASFAA board,  please consider throwing your hat in the ring for one of the following positions:

  • President-Elect (Three year commitment)
  • Secretary (Two year commitment)
  • Oklahoma Delegate-At-Large (Two year commitment)
  • Texas Delegate-At-Large (Two year commitment)

The on-line Officer Nomination Form is available at the SWASFAA’s home page.  If you know a member who is interested in serving, but is shy about nominating herself/himself, please nominate her/him.  Of course, it would be a good idea to confirm with the member of her/his willingness to be nominated 🙂

If you have any questions about the commitment requirements for the open positions, please do not hesitate to contact me or any prior board member.   I have no doubt that current and prior board members will gladly share their experience.

Deadline for submission of nominations is June 30, 2017.

 

 

 

 

Three Institutional Factors Impacting Student Attrition

Submitted by Memory Keller of Student Connections

In addition to the primary research we conduct, such as through our work with students and academic experts on our Advisory Boards, Student Connections regularly reviews findings from around the industry. Recently, we examined factors impacting student retention at colleges and universities in the United States.

Financial aid and resources available
It’s no surprise that students most commonly abandon their pursuit of higher education because of money.  In fact, ACT identifies the amount of financial aid available to students as the number one factor contributing to student attrition rates for all types of colleges and universities. (Wesley R. Habley and Randy McClanahan, “What Works in Student Retention?” ACT, 2004, p. 10). Financial aid services is also listed among the top factors.  Further, Ruffalo Noel Levitz reports that the high cost of schooling, an obligation to obtain full-time employment because of financial need, personal emergencies and uncertainty about the return on investment from a college education all contribute to student attrition (“2016 National Report:  Freshman Motivations to Complete College,” Ruffalo Noel Levitz, 2016, p. 4).

Choosing the right school and program
In addition to finances, uninformed decisions regarding which institution to attend and a poor understanding of the matriculation process appear to be major factors in student attrition.  The Institute for Higher Education Policy reports that choosing which institution to attend is a complicated and confusing process, especially for first-generation and non-traditional students (Tiffane Cochran and Ann Coles, “Maximizing the College Choice Process to Increase Fit & Match for Underserved Students,” Institute For Higher Education Policy, 2011, p. 3). These students often do not have the background or access to tools that will help them fully consider the different pathways to the achievement of their educational goals. Once they do select an institution, they are often challenged by admission and financial aid processes.  These factors often lead to students not selecting the institution that would best meet their individual needs and subsequently dropping out before they achieve their educational goals.

Lack of involvement and engagement
The third institutional factor impacting student attrition is lack of student involvement in campus life.  According to the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), the more involved students are with their institutions, the more invested they are in their education.  NSSE also has identified a correlation between student involvement and higher grades and completion rates.  It makes sense that feelings of safety and belonging can go a long way toward keeping students engaged and working toward their educational goals.

The good news in these variables lies in what they share in common: They are under institutional influence. There are steps you can take today at your school to improve student engagement, understanding of enrollment requirements and campus culture, and financial literacy. In fact, the more you consider these seemingly disparate areas, the more apparent it becomes that they are integrated aspects of one unifying goal: student success. You may find you have little control over one area. However, by seizing opportunities to make a positive difference in others, you can shape the common outcome they produce.

Come Together Right Now!

In the ever changing world of Financial Aid, we look to each other to help wade through the mud and the muck.  SWASFAA is here to give you an outlet to network, training, and best practices.  So, what does SWASFAA have for me?  That is a great question.  This year we have some very exciting things to talk about.  The political climate is unsure.  The Department is uneasy as to what happens next.  We are faced with many uncertainties.  So, what do we do…. “Come together right now!”

Please join us this year for training…We have webinars that will be throughout the year with best practices.  We have Mid-Level training with NASFAA credentials.  We have Boot Camp for beginners.  We have Leadership training with more NASFAA credentials.  We have conference at Great Wolf Lodge in Grapeville TX (DFW area)

Renew or Join with SWASFAA membership on our website.  It is as easy as 123 or ABC.

http://www.swasfaa.org/docs/forms/memApp.html

 

We are looking forward to a great year at SWASFAA.

Low-Income Students Can Miss Out on Opportunities

When perception equals reality, low-income students can miss out on opportunities
By Memory Keeler – Student Connections, a USA Funds company

Over the past few months, I’ve been speaking with many colleagues about the nonacademic barriers to student success, and I often reference the 2016 FAFSA completion data. Of particular interest is the fact that the national FAFSA completion rate for high school seniors fell from 40.9 percent to 39.6 percent and that only five states – Oregon, West Virginia, Utah, North Carolina and Texas saw an increase in completion.

Low-income students’ misconceptions about financial aid
In October 2016, the National College Access Network (NCAN) released a report that examined the mindset of low-income students about their financial aid eligibility. It identifies some of the reasons that rate may be low, particularly for this population of students. The report begins by noting a 2011-12 National Postsecondary Student Aid Survey. The survey asked students to indicate why they hadn’t applied for aid, and 44.7 percent said it was because they did not believe they were eligible. But what is this belief based on?

The report goes on to explore current attitudes and behaviors toward financial aid among low-income students. It concludes that the belief that they are ineligible for aid often masks a troubling reality: they do not know whether or not they are eligible. These students are less likely to pursue aid opportunities. Because these findings have major implications for students and schools, they should help schools shape outreach strategies.

Getting resources to the students who need them
This is confirmed elsewhere in the study, where data show that, despite an abundance of information about student aid, the knowledge is not reaching the students who most need it. For example, 64 percent of the students who did not apply for aid reported they had no information about aid or had mistaken notions about it (for example, believing food stamps were a type of financial aid). Think about that: More than half of those who don’t apply for aid don’t understand what it is. Whether or not they are eligible becomes unfortunately irrelevant until we address that knowledge gap.

Further findings in the report identified a stark contrast in awareness of important issues between students who apply for aid and those who don’t. For example, 55 percent of students who didn’t apply believed that grants must be repaid, while only 12 percent of those who did apply held that belief. 32 percent of students who didn’t apply believed government loans were the same as private loans, whereas only 13 percent of students who applied believed that.

But what I found most telling among these statistics relates to this statement: “There are plenty of people I can ask about financial aid at my school.” 73 percent of students who applied for aid agreed with it, compared to only 34 percent of those who did not pursue aid. This is a staggering split between the two groups, and it underscores the importance of institutions raising awareness about financial literacy and other student engagement resources.

Although the sample size was small, this study does shed some light on why students may feel they are not eligible and do not apply. Particularly with the low national completion rate for all students, we need to focus more on getting the message out to those who need it. Students feel overwhelmed about the process to the point they are not connecting with the information that is out there. Institutions can address this with thoughtful engagement with students throughout the matriculation process and through college completion.

“Financial Aid All Stars, Hit It Out of the Park”

“Financial Aid All Stars, Hit It Out of the Park”, such an appropriate theme for the TASFAA  2016 Conference, held in Frisco.  Conveniently located by the Dr. Pepper Ballpark. Though the season was over for the Frisco RoughRiders, the park was lite up Wednesday night.   Awesome view from my hotel room.

Flipping through the conference agenda, it was difficult to decide which sessions to attend.  One of my favorites was a student panel.  Listening to students talk about what is important to them about the financial aid process.  Not a surprise, communication, and methods of communicating, being the topic of discussion.

During Thursday’s lunch, as I was chatting with Lisa Blazer, NASFAA Chair, it became obvious that SWASFAA is a great hands with Denise Welch as incoming President and Shannon Crossland incoming President-Elect.  TASFAA sure represents at the regional and national level.

I don’t think I walked past a TASFAA member without hearing “thank you for attending our conference.”  Talk about making one feel welcomed, wow!

Thank you, TASFAA, for inviting me to an awesome conference!  Had a great time and learned so much.  Every conference presents a learning opportunity.

Looking forward to “sharing” my experiences from the AASFAA and LASFAA conferences.  What a great organization we are all part of!!

 

 

 

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